The New York Philharmonic

Update Browser

Pages don't look right?

You are using a browser that does not support the technology used on our website.

Please select a different browser or use your phone or tablet to access our site.

Download: Firefox | Chrome | Safari

If you're using Internet Explorer, please update to the latest version.

Gilbert Conducts Strauss

More

Conductor

Alan Gilbert

Alan Gilbert, former Music Director of the New York Philharmonic, launches a new appointment as chief conductor designate of Hamburg’s NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra this fall, shortly after the opening of its already iconic new home. The Grammy Award–winning conductor previously served as principal guest conductor of the orchestra (then known as NDR Symphony Orchestra Hamburg) for more than a decade, and will assume the role of chief conductor in September 2019. This position follows his truly transformative eight-year tenure as Music Director of the New York Philharmonic, during which, through such key initiatives as the NY PHIL BIENNIAL, he succeeded in making the Orchestra a leader on the cultural landscape. Alan Gilbert is also conductor laureate of the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic and the founder and president of Musicians for Unity. With the endorsement and guidance of the United Nations, this new organization will bring together musicians from around the world to perform in support of peace, development, and human rights.

Alan Gilbert makes regular guest appearances with orchestras including the Berlin Philharmonic, Amsterdam’s Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, The Cleveland Orchestra, Boston Symphony Orchestra, The Philadelphia Orchestra, Dresden Staatskapelle, and Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France. He has led operatic productions for Milan’s Teatro alla Scala, The Metropolitan Opera, Los Angeles Opera, Zurich Opera, Royal Swedish Opera, and Santa Fe Opera, where he was the inaugural music director.

His discography includes The Nielsen Project, a box set recorded with the New York Philharmonic, and John Adams’s Doctor Atomic, captured on DVD at The Metropolitan Opera, for which he won a Grammy Award. He received Emmy Award nominations for Outstanding Music Direction in PBS’s Live From Lincoln Center broadcasts of two star-studded New York Philharmonic productions: of Sweeney Todd and Sinatra: Voice for a Century.

Alan Gilbert has received Honorary Doctor of Music degrees from the Curtis Institute of Music and Westminster Choir College, as well as Columbia University’s Ditson Conductor’s Award. He is a member of The American Academy of Arts & Sciences, and was named an Officier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French government. At The Juilliard School, he is the first holder of the William Schuman Chair in Musical Studies and serves as Director of Conducting and Orchestral Studies. After giving the annual Royal Philharmonic Society Lecture on Orchestras in the 21st Century: A New Paradigm during the New York Philharmonic’s EUROPE / SPRING 2015 tour, he received a 2015 Foreign Policy Association Medal for his commitment to cultural diplomacy.

Learn more about Alan Gilbert

More

Violin

Frank Huang
Frank Huang article

 


Frank Huang joined the New York Philharmonic as Concertmaster, The Charles E. Culpeper Chair, in September 2015. The First Prize Winner of the 2003 Walter W. Naumburg Foundation’s Violin Competition and the 2000 Hannover International Violin Competition, he has established a major career as a violin virtuoso. Since performing with the Houston Symphony in a nationally broadcast concert at the age of 11 he has appeared with orchestras throughout the world including The Cleveland Orchestra, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, Indianapolis Symphony, NDR Radio Philharmonic Orchestra of Hannover, Amadeus Chamber Orchestra, and the Genoa Orchestra. He has also performed on NPR’s Performance Today, ABC’s Good Morning America, and CNN’s American Morning with Paula Zahn. He has performed at Wigmore Hall (in London), Salle Cortot (Paris), Kennedy Center (Washington, D.C.), and the Herbst Theatre (San Francisco), as well as a second recital in Alice Tully Hall (New York), which featured the World Premiere of Donald Martino’s Sonata for Solo Violin. Mr. Huang’s first commercial recording — featuring fantasies by Schubert, Ernst, Schoenberg, and Waxman — was released on Naxos in 2003. He made his New York Philharmonic solo debut in June 2016 leading and performing Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons and Piazzolla’s Four Seasons of Buenos Aires, as well as leading Grieg’s The Last Spring. In October–November 2016 he performed Bruch’s Violin Concerto No. 1, led by Pablo Heras-Casado.

Mr. Huang has had great success in competitions since the age of 15 and received top prize awards in the Premio Paganini International Violin Competition and the Indianapolis International Violin Competition. Other honors include Gold Medal Awards in the Kingsville International Competition, Irving M. Klein International Competition, and D’Angelo International Competition.

In addition to his solo career, Mr. Huang is deeply committed to chamber music. He is a member of the New York Philharmonic String Quartet, established in the 2016–17 season, and has performed at the Marlboro Music Festival, Ravinia’s Steans Institute, Seattle Chamber Music Festival, and Caramoor. He frequently participates in Musicians from Marlboro’s tours, and was selected by The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center to be a member of the prestigious CMS Two program. Before joining the Houston Symphony as concertmaster in 2010, Frank Huang held the position of first violinist of the Grammy Award–winning Ying Quartet and was a faculty member at the Eastman School of Music.

Frank Huang was born in Beijing, China. At the age of seven he moved to Houston, Texas, where he began violin lessons with his mother. He commenced study with Fredell Lack at the University of Houston and at 16 he enrolled in the pre-college program at the Cleveland Institute of Music (CIM) where he studied with Donald Weilerstein. He continued studies with Weilerstein in college and earned his bachelor of music degree from CIM in 2002. He subsequently attended The Juilliard School in New York City, studying violin with Robert Mann. He is an alumnus of the Music Academy of the West, now a partner in the New York Philharmonic Global Academy, and serves on the faculties of The Shepherd School of Music at Rice University, also a New York Philharmonic Global Academy partner, and the University of Houston.

Learn more about Frank Huang

More

LA Variations

ESA-PEKKA SALONEN (b. 1958)
LA Variations (1996)

Newsday enthused: “Splashy and stylish debut, calculated to impress.” The Los Angeles Times said: “It is music of immediate appeal and relevance that doesn't need to overthrow Minimalism to get there. This is an important step in musical culture at the end of the century.” In his program notes, Esa-Pekka Salonen explains that the Variations of the title refer to variations on two chords, each of which consists of six notes, together covering all twelve notes of a chromatic scale. Throughout the LA Variations there is a driving, motoric quality that creates a tremendous amount of excitement, especially from the huge percussion forces, led by a nearly constant presence of the timpani. But as the Variations approach the end the piccolo provides a lovely, quiet finale. Our 2015–18 Marie-Josée Kravis Composer-in-Residence Esa-Pekka Salonen created LA Variations as a showcase for the Los Angeles Philharmonic, whose music director he was at the time of its composition. As he said: “I’m very proud of the virtuosity of my orchestra.” It’s easy to hear how he had them in mind in this vibrant and celebratory work. Its premiere in 1997 was enthusiastically received by both audiences and critics alike.

More

Ein Heldenleben

RICHARD STRAUSS (1864–1949)
Ein Heldenleben (A Hero’s Life) (1898)

“I do not see why I should not compose a symphony about myself; I find myself quite as interesting as Napoleon or Alexander.” Certainly, modesty was never one of Richard Strauss’s failings, and he wasn’t shy about communicating his high opinion of himself, as we can hear in the expansive musical self-portrait Ein Heldenleben, told in six continuous, frequently romantic, sections. This tone poem is one in a string of heroic portraits Strauss had already composed, only this one is all about the composer himself as hero. If you’re following the score, the brass section alone is one to be reckoned with: eight horns, five trumpets, three trombones, and tenor and bass tubas. And there’s a large battery of percussion instruments that adds to the brawn of the composer’s bravura. Yet bluster and thunder aren’t all that will impress you. There’s the epic opening section — The Hero — (obviously Strauss himself) that leaves listeners nearly breathless with the composer’s signature horn calls; unflattering, snarling sounds from the wind section in the depiction of The Hero’s Adversaries (read: the critics); rapturous solo violin passages that allude to one side of The Hero’s Companion’s personality (Strauss’s temperamental wife, Pauline) that soon evolve into full-orchestra mode playing lush, sensuous love music; The Hero’s Deeds of War is a wild and woolly battle scene full of musical chaos that ends in triumph, of course; musical “selfies” in the section titled The Hero’s Works of Peace remind us of other Strauss compositions; and the finale — The Hero’s Escape from the World and Fulfillment — presents some of the most sublime music Strauss ever created. 

  • Listen Anytime

    Alec Baldwin

     

    Listen To A Broadcast Online
  • Philharmonic History

    From the Archives

     

    Visit the Digital Archives
  • Concert Downloads

    img

     

    Search Recordings